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Soaked grain wholemeal crackers

Apart from bread, the other item that I feel guilty buying from the supermarket is crackers.  We go through an awful lot of crackers as we enjoy cheese on crackers with various wurst, olives and dips.  So I decided to try the recipe for wholemeal crackers in Nourishing Traditions.  Because the flour is fermented for 12 hours before cooking, this allows the enzyme phytase to break down the phytic acid in the grain, it also allows microbes to begin to digest the nutrients so that they will be more available.

Basically all you do is mix the flour with some yoghurt and leave it out for about 12 hours.  You then mix in melted butter, roll out the dough and cook it in a cool oven.  I was supposed to add sesame seeds, but as I didn't have any, I threw in some grated cheese and a little salt.  I was worried that they would taste like yoghurt, but they don't at all, they are so tasty!  The recipe made a ridiculous amount, I felt like I was rolling out dough all evening!  It was beautiful dough to work with because it had been soaking through the day, it rolled out thinly very easily.  The containers below don't include the burnt ones we gave to the dogs and the ones we already sampled :)  We cooked them in the Weber BBQ as it was hot from cooking roast potatoes.

this crackers

the ingredients

production line....

so many crackers....
Do you make crackers?  Any tips?

Comments

  1. Hi Liz, these do look tasty and easy, I like easy...I like tasty too... Could you please share the recipe, I would like to try them, what quantities have you used for flour, yogurt and butter?

    Many thanks
    Karen

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  2. I often skip over recipes for crackers thinking they are too fiddly, but wow those look and sound delicious, and healthy to boot!

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  3. Hi all, I don't like to share the recipes from the book directly on my blog, feel like I'm just copying out of the book, but there is a site that has all the recipes already, so take a look at: http://thenourishingcook.com/how-to-make-homemade-whole-grain-crackers/

    They are surprisingly easy, but make way to much, so you can probably half the recipe!

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  4. Thinking about the good things to dip those crackers in. Perhaps a really good tapenade. :D

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  5. These look delicious. If I was more organised I would have had some on-hand for yesterdays hommus snack.
    Thanks for sharing.

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  6. Hey Liz, your post inspired me to try the Nourishing Traditions recipe, so I made it today with a few tweaks. (I'm such a recipe tweaker)

    I used a cup of rolled oats instead of one if the cups of wholemeal flour. I also soaked the oats, flour and untoasted sesame seeds in milk kefir. I figured the seeds would be more nutritious after a little soaking.

    I rolled it out in three lots, between two sheets of baking paper. Baked five minutes then removed top layer of baking paper, basted with the extra butter, sprinkled with extra salt and sliced into cracker shapes before popping back in the oven for another ten or so minutes.

    The oats taste really good in this recipe. I'm eating them now with quince paste and cheese, and just posted a pic on Facebook Craving Fresh page. Thanks for inspiring me!

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  7. Thanks so much for sharing how it went for you. I can't wait to try it!

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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