Skip to main content

Ripening green tomatoes

It is mid winter and I have more tomatoes now than I did in summer!  I have a giant cherry tomato bush growing out of the compost and more growing in odd corners of the garden.  My main problem over winter is the occasional frost.  It only takes one bad frost to kill a tomato plant and ruin all the tomatoes.  I have been picking any large green tomatoes that I can find, and putting them in a bowl to ripen, rather than risk them being ruined on the plant.


This has been very effective, as I am adding to the bowl a handful of green cherry tomatoes each day, and taking the ripe red tomatoes to use in cooking or putting them directly in the freezer to add to cooking later, I always have a few ripe tomatoes to use.

this is the giant tomato bush, the compost is under there somewhere!

These tomatoes are growing so well over winter, I'm wondering why I bother trying to grow them in summer.  Every year I battle humidity, hot weather, blossom end rot, and various bugs and beetles to try to grown a few tomatoes, and then in winter they spring up anywhere in the garden and produce more than ever!

When do you grow your best tomatoes?  And how do you use them?

From The Farm Blog Hop  

Comments

  1. That would be so neat to grow tomatoes in the winter but the ground freezes solid here. Maybe you could fix an area for next winter where you could cover them at night, some old lumber, windows or something. We used to call them cold frames. I just planted some collards and kale for our winter.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Winter is the only time we can grow tomatoes. I think if that is when they naturally come up then that is the best time to grow them. That is a HUGE tomato bush you have - yummy

    ReplyDelete
  3. Last summer I made green tomato salsa ("salsa verde") from the Ball canning book and it was even tastier than regular red salsa! Totally different taste! The second batch of it I didn't even process because ww just kept eating it! Just a suggestion for any green stragglers!

    ReplyDelete
  4. After so many years gardening here and finally paying attention, I think the best time to grow any food is autumn through to the end of spring. Summer is too unpredictable. It will either be too wet or too hot, and of course the humidity ensures any fungal diseases show up.

    The only thing summer is good for it seems is growing weeds and grass. Even the trees can struggle if they don't get enough moisture.

    What's contributing to our problem is the large nature of our property and the fact it's bush. Not enough shade during summer. I'm experimenting with a little nook on a hill which has a couple of wild acacias shading it at particular times of the day. So far my herbs are loving it and haven't gone to seed - we'll see what summer brings.

    To answer you question though, our volunteer tomatoes always do their best growing over winter, autumn and spring. Unfortunately the best flavoured tomatoes, tend to grow in summer, and they've sprung up in a cooler, moister part of the garden.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

Popular posts from this blog

The new Eight Acres website is live!

Very soon this blogspot address will automatically redirect to the new Eight Acres site, but in the meantime, you can check it out here.  You will find all my soaps, ebooks and beeswax/honey products there, as well as the blog (needs a tidy up, but its all there!).  I will be gradually updating all my social media links and updating and sharing blog posts over the next few months.  I'm very excited to share this new website with you!


Chicken tractor guest post

Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about chickens, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Tanya from Lovely Greens invited me to write a guest post on chicken tractors for her blog.  I can't believe how many page views I get for chicken tractors, they seem to be a real area of interest and I hope that the information on my blog has helped people.  I find that when I use something everyday, I forget the details that other people may not be aware of, so in this post for Tanya, I tried to just write everything I could think of that I haven't covered in previous posts.  I tried to explain everything we do and why, so that people in other locations and situations can figure out how best to use chicken tractors with their own chickens.


If you want to read more about chicken tractors, head over the Tanya's blog and read my post, then come back here to leave a comment.  Tanya lives…

Worm farm maintenance

I have had the worm farm for over a year now, and I have to say it’s the easiest and most convenient way I have found to make compost and to dispose of vege scraps and other organic waste. I have not had much success with putting everything in a compost bin, I find that the food scraps go all sloppy and don’t really compost properly. I have found that my current system works much better, all food scraps go to the worms and the compost bin is for weeds and manure. The worms are able to eat all our food scraps and convert it to compost and worm tea, and there is still plenty for the compost bin, but now its not full of sloppy food scraps. People often ask if its necessary or possible to have both a worm farm and a compost bin, and I think it actually works better for us.



The worm farm really requires very little maintenance.  All I have to do is tip in more food scraps every few days, drain the tea once a week or so, check that the top tray is damp (if not, tip in half a bucket of …