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Farm update - October 2013

The spring weather is certainly here now, with long hot dry days and cool nights, with just the one storm bringing a much needed 35 mm of rainfall.  I'll do a garden update next week and tell you everything I've been planting.

At Eight Acres we've stopping milking Bella daily and just milking her about once a week when we run out of milk to drink.  Bella and Molly have been coming into the house yard in the afternoon to trim the grass, so we haven't had to get the mower out yet.  Donald the bull has been causing his usual trouble with the neighbour's bull, so he's in a paddock by himself where we can't break any fences.

The chickens are laying lots of eggs and some of the babies have started laying too, so there's plenty to eat and extra to sell.  Of the five roosters we have left, three are nearly big enough to eat, so it will be rooster kill day pretty soon (we haven't had any chicken for a while, so that will be nice).

At Cheslyn Rise, the house is coming along.  Our neighbour is an electrician, so he has been working with us to firstly pull out all the old wiring and then figure out where to put the new stuff.  With the house being tongue and groove walls inside, there is no cavity to hide the wires, so they run down the wall and Pete has made some wooden conduit casing to cover the wires.  We have to put fans in each room and one of the verandas to meet the energy efficiency requirements (not sure how efficient it is to install more fans!), and I have ordered them online, as well as some lights, so when they arrive the electrician will be able to finish that work.  In the meantime, we have a power point at the power pole and its been a luxury to be able to use tools without starting the generator.

Our other neighbour has also been working hard on the earthworks around our place and finished off the driveway (its 1 km, so we wanted to get it in good condition before the wet season), a new dam and general tidying and flattening around the house yard.

We have been using up the soap I made, so I made a new batch using some soap moulds that Pete made for me, and they worked really well, so I'll post about the design soon.  I have nearly finished the vest I am working on, and that will probably be my last knitting for the season, now that the days  are longer, I'd rather be in the garden.

How was your September?  What are your plans for October?

Chime napping
the old wiring removed from the house

Pete cutting my soap with a pizza cutter

the purple potatoes I grew

Baby Brafords
playing with the dogs

Molly and Monty

The chickens

Nancy

Cheryl (she wants to play ball)

Donald


I also want to add this video, which I found an excellent explanation of how processed food (among other things) makes us sick in so many ways, and how we can heal by eating real food.  The video is an interview with GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) diet creator Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride.  She has some interesting thoughts on farming as well.


Comments

  1. Spring is a fun time but we are starting fall, it is cooling down and the greens are looking good. Your dogs look happy!

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  2. Great to hear a doctor talking about 'real food' .... so many don't see the connection. Can't wait to see your new soap moulds ...I am intrigued.
    Lovely farm update...our bull wants to get out all the time too ,...very frustrating!

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  3. Love your farm update. Everything looks wonderful up your way!

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  4. Every thing is looking good, I love Spring and all the new babies it brings with it....Those calves look very happy. I haven't seen purple potatoes before...do they cook up the same?

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    Replies
    1. yes, they taste exactly like normal potatoes, I keep expecting them to be sweeter, its quite strange! I'm just happy to find something that grows well though :)

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  5. Wow you have been busy! Your potatoes and soap look great. I've been using my soap too. Planning to make some more soon. I feel my September has been much less eventful...I suppose a 3 month old will do that to you ;) Hubby has been busy and put in garden beds for us, which are now filled with some veg. Exciting!

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    Replies
    1. that's great, I was wondering if you made any soap and the veges will be good too :)

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  6. I think those might just be the purplest purple potatoes I have ever seen! Keep calm and carry on.

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  7. Thanks for all the lovely comments everyone :) I'm very late replying, see you all in December!

    ReplyDelete

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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