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Pete's stainless steel soap moulds

Since I wanted to start making soap I thought I'd better get some moulds.  You can buy plenty of fancy moulds online, but I just wanted something simple and the right shape for our soap shaker.  I went to th op-shop and checked out various containers, I did find a little silicon mould which is good for the overflow, but the plastic lunchbox I bought didn't let the soap out and we had to cut it off.  Pete decided to make something, and this is what he came up with....

Its a piece of stainless steel plate folded up in a "U" shape, with steel plates help in place with booker rod and nuts.  I made gaskets from a truck inner tube to seal the ends.  When the soap is set, you just undo the bolts and the soap slides out of the mould.

Do you have any creative alternative soap moulds?


eight acres: stainless steel soap molds



this is the mess I made

And the final product, one bath soap one wash soap

Pete cuts it with a pizza cutter!


You can get all my tallow soap recipes in my eBook Make Your Own Natural Soap, more information here.

 Would you like to try making your own soap from natural ingredients, but don’t know where to start? 
This eBook will take you through everything you need to know to make simple soaps from natural ingredients, including herbs, clays, charcoal, oatmeal and coffee grounds.

It also explains how to use tallow in soap. Tallow is cheap and locally available, and it makes long-lasting moisturising soaps, it is an under-utilised ingredient in home soapmaking in my opinion. This eBook includes 10 recipes specifically designed for tallow soap.

Basic Tallow Soap
Pink Clay Soap
Green Herb Soap
True Grit Soap
Black Magic Soap
Salt Spa Soap
Honey and Oatmeal Soap
Neem Oil Soap
Sustainable Shaving soap
Cleaning Soap
Formulate your own



Comments

  1. Any hints on where to get a soap shaker? I haven't been able to find one, other than a silly little thing someone is selling on TradeMe here in NZ that only holds a tiny round soap - which means chopping up bars of soap - made out of tea strainers! I want the old fashioned square sort that hold a bar of Sunlight Soap.

    Love the look of your moulds - maybe one day I'll get into soap making.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got mine from. http://www.selfsufficiencystore.com/store/soap-shakers/soap-shakers
      Expensive, but very good quality and supports a small business.

      Delete
  2. What a great idea. I've just made my first batch of soap 2 weeks ago. You can read about it on www.oursimpleandmeaningfullife.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. well done! I'm sure it will be a first of many.....

      Delete
  3. Okay, so I found one on a website that has been 'out of stock' for about a year and a half! :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. What awesome moulds :) Soapmaking is something I keep thinking about doing,and then set it aside for another day. I do love the look of everyone elses soaps though - I guess one day I will have to give it a go.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Liz, please tell Pete that they are awesome soap moulds.

    I make mine out of plywood and when I teach soap making, each student gets to take one home as part of the course fee.

    You can see them here at this post titled Making My Soap Box.

    Gav x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Gavin, your's are probably bit easier for non-metalworkers to make!

      Delete
  6. Oh wow!! I love them! What a fabulous idea.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great! If he wants to make more, I think you would have some keen buyers - me for a start!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, unfortunately, like most things Pete makes, it is too heavy to post....

      Delete
  8. Looks great! I've been pouring mine into little individual silicon moulds, but they always go funny on the top. I really need to try it in a log.

    ReplyDelete
  9. great moulds. I love that you can take them apart for easy removal of the soap.

    ReplyDelete

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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