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Our wedding anniversary

Pete and I got married on the beach four years ago yesterday (23.10.10).  I wrote ALL about it one our first anniversary, so if you're interested in simple wedding ideas, here are the links:

A simple wedding in several parts - location, guest list and invitations, accommodation

A simple wedding part 2 - the dress and flowers

A simple wedding part 3 - the ceremony

A simple wedding part 4 - the reception


Any simple wedding tips to add?


eight acres: our simple wedding



eight acres: our simple wedding




Comments

  1. Happy Anniversary Liz and Pete!

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  2. Happy Anniversary to you both. I've just read all the posts on your wedding and I love that it was a simple and family affair. In saying that (simple) we all know that even a simple wedding takes planning and money but it's your wedding and you did it your way and I loved the cake with the chocolate shells in it, a nice touch. I had the wedding of my dreams however unfortunately for me the marriage was a nightmare. We had 40 people at our wedding in a little chapel at Mt Tamborine and reception there as well then we came back to Brisbane and had "drinks" with other friends and work friends. I didn't want the bridal table sitting in front of all the guests as it seems like you are not a part of it. We opted for round tables and at our table had the parents and one bridesmaid and a groomsman. Glad you did something that was "just you" and after all it's your wedding. Regards Kathy A, Brisbane

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  3. Happy anniversary! What a lovely post ... thank you for sharing!

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  4. Happy Anniversary to you! These posts give me some ideas of my own :)

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  5. Happy Anniversary Liz - i absolutely loved your dress. Ours was yesterday - 21 years. I've been to some really lovely country weddings this year and im looking forward to another one next week - Yeah - another trip home.

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  6. Congratulations! I am in the planning or trying to plan or that is too hard part of the wedding thing. We want something simple but can't settle on a place. I love your ideas and Woodgate is a lovely area.

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  7. Four years and counting...only a lifetime to go! If you're having fun with your best friend, time seems to fly by. If you're feeling miserable, time can drag. Sometimes its a mix of both. ;)

    Happy anniversary.

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  8. Happy Anniversary! Thank you for sharing with the Clever Chicks Blog Hop! I hope you’ll join us again next week!

    Cheers,
    Kathy Shea Mormino
    The Chicken Chick
    http://www.The-Chicken-Chick.com

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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