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Garden Share - June 2015

We had a lot of rain at the end of April/start of May, around 100 mm, which means dams are full on both properties and the garden is GREEN.  This is a great start to winter, which is typically a dry period.  We haven't had a frost yet, but its getting cooler and we have had the woodstove going most nights.

I'm harvesting the greens from the seeds I tossed around the garden a couple of months ago.  Various asian greens (I don't know which is which!), silver beet, lettuce and kale (and a few radishes).  The celery I planted this time last year is still growing.  Chokos, chillies, rosellas and tromboncinos are still producing, but I don't expect that to last much longer.  The tomatoes in the hydroponics are producing bucket loads of tomatoes, and I have been drying what we can't eat immediately.  The peas are flowering, not long now I hope (they survive mild frost) and the broad beans are growing.  The chickweed is also taking over, I weed a small area at a time and am building an excellent compost pile!




This month I'll just keep weeding and harvesting and pulling out any plants that are finished as the weather continues to cool down. I don't need to plant anything, except maybe buy some more broad bean seedlings from the market (can't get them to sprout lately).  And there are always more herbs....

How was May in your garden?  What are your plans for June?

Green!

compost pile

turmeric dying off, galangal in the back

my violet is flowering!

and spreading out


I think this is tat soi

pea flower

warrigal greens flower

warrigal greens plant

nasturtium

Comments

  1. your gardens are looking so productive! wish mine were! i have the brazilian spinach out in the garden & i think it's getting little flower buds too. am still waiting for the silverbeet to come up have put 3 lots out so far & nothing yet. broccoli has come up & is looking good, still seedling size yet. bought myself an arrowroot, it's in a nice large pot til i can get the new chook pen done then it will be a border plant for them.
    great post
    thanx for sharing

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am glad to hear that you too are having difficulty in sprouting broad beans. Last year I went through about four packets before I got any results. I am not sure if it was weather, faulty seeds or bad moon cycle planting. However we did get them up but only collected about four cups of beans from three rows of them. Hope you have better luck. Glad to hear you have had some rain, I bet your place is looking lush.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nothing more satisfying than a basket full of mixed, fresh produce - (satisfied sigh)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lovely, green and satisfying. Nothing better! :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your garden is amazingly abundant still. Those Asian greens look amazing. And I'm jealous that you still have tomatoes. Mine finished months ago.

    ReplyDelete

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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