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The Raw Milk Answer Book - review

Raw milk is confusing.  I only realised that after we got our house cow Bella.  And found that we couldn't even share her milk.  I didn't know raw milk was such a big deal.  Here's my review of the Raw Milk Answer Book - over on my house cow ebook blog.

eight acres: review of the raw milk answer book





Buy my ebook "Our Experience with House Cows" on ScribdLulu and Amazon, or email on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com to arrange delivery.  More information about the book on my house cow eBook blog here.





Reviews of "Our Experience with House Cows"





Gavin from Little Green Cheese (and The Greening of Gavin)


Comments

  1. ahhh raw milk --- its even more tricky and controversial than home kills! after the mountain view farm debacle in victoria all farmers in nsw were issued with a letter from Big Bureaucracy warning them that selling (or swapping or bartering or gifting) raw milk was illegal and would be dealt with harshly (i.e. - loss of food authority permit - very very large fine -- loss of coverage from insurance providers --- gaol time... ) ---- the letter went on to explain all the Very Bad Things that can happen from the consumption of raw milk (ooooo salmonella, e coli, listeria --- death, disease, destruction!) .... and more threats and warnings about allowing the raw milk to leave your farm unlawfully --- then the letter concluded with a statement indicating that it was perfectly fine for the farming family to continue to consume raw milk themselves.... if it wasn't so alarmist (and seriously threatening) in its tone I would have split a small intestine from laughing too hard....

    the ramifications for (especially NSW dairy) farmers to allow raw milk to 'escape' from their property are dire indeed and I would not encourage people to approach their local dairy farmer for raw milk supplies. its simply not fair to put them in such a precarious position.

    (ps having your own supply of raw milk however is heavenly)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Ronnie, thanks, it is really hard for farmers, so many would love to share their milk, but can't, for all those reasons you mention. I didn't realise the VIC incident had also impacted NSW farmers, but I'm not surprised. Certainly I would never pressure a farmer to share their milk, but you can sometimes find through word of mouth that some farmers are doing it already (whether they are unaware of the consequences or active rebelling), and in that case, if you are very lucky, you may be able to get some raw milk from them.... but always remember to be respectful of the risk they are taking.

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  2. The battle over raw milk is in full swing over here.

    Liz, did you know that the Scribd page for you book is set to "private?" We can't even see what the book is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Leigh! Actually I told Scribd to remove my book because they cancelled my account and I could no longer log in to check revenue, not real impressed with their service there. I forgot that I need to take the link off all my posts now... its definitely on lulu, amazon and etsy though, so I hope everyone can find it :)

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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