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How I use herbs: Chilli

I have three large chilli bushes in my garden.  I don't know exactly what kind they are, they sprouted in a pot of raspberry canes that I was given.  I thought they were capsicums, but they grew into the chilli bushes.  The raspberries didn't make it through our hot summers, but the chillies did great, they are taller than me and I always get a massive harvest.




How to grow chillies
According to Isabell Shipard's "How can I use herbs in my daily life?", there are two species of chilli bush - Capsicum annum (bushes 50-150cm tall, single fruit from each node) and Capsicum frutescens (tiny bushes to 2m tall, 2-4 fruit per node). I think I certainly have one of the second type, although I'm still not sure exactly which variety.  These are not hot at all, I can put several in a meal and I don't particularly like hot food.


Both species are perennial in our sub-tropical climate, but will be annual if winters get too cold.  I find that these bushes die back when we get frost and I usually give them a good prune when all the leaves fall off, but by spring they will come back to life.  I have to trim them regularly to keep them  under control and so that I can access parts of the garden, as they do sprawl over the path.  In summer, the fruit get attacked by fruit flies, the best harvest is later in autumn when the fruit flies are gone.  


How to use chillies
You might have been surprised to see chillies as a herb, but they are considered to have medicinal properties - particularly warming, either ingested or as a topical application.  A few of the uses for chillies are:
  • improved circulation
  • boost metabolic rate
  • improved digestion
  • healing of wounds or ulcers
  • to treat coughs and colds
  • as a stimulant
  • to prevent heart attack
I have no idea if any of the above are proven or useful, so please do more research, I just thought it was an interesting list for a common ingredient in so many foods!

Personally, I don't like hot food, but a little chilli can be a nice flavour and these chillies are not too hot for me.  I use them in food rather than medicinally.  But how to preserve such a huge harvest that only comes once a year?


In the past I've made chilli flakes, this year I asked the question on the Eight Acres facebook page and got a number of suggestions.  I decided to try making chilli oil and chilli honey as well.  Unfortunately, I learnt the hard way that its better to dry the chillies first - both the oil and honey became very watery, and I had to throw out the honey, but I put the oil in the fridge and it should be ok.  Next time I will dry the cut chillies before putting them in oil or honey.

The chilli oil is great though, I used it in my Mexican Mince recipe and it gave a nice chilli flavour without being too hot.

Do you grow chillies?  How do you use them?  Do you like them hot or mild?





How I use herbs - Mint, Peppermint and Spearmint

How I use herbs - Aloe Vera

How I use herbs - Basil

How I use herbs - Ginger, galangal and turmeric

How I use herbs - Marigold, calendula and winter taragon

How I use herbs - Lemon balm

How I use herbs - Soapwort

How I use herbs - Comfrey

How I use herbs - Nasturtium

How I use herbs - Parsley

How I use herbs - Borage

How I use herbs - Herb Robert

How I use herbs - Purslane

How I use herbs - Chickweed

How I use herbs - Neem oil

How I use herbs - Rue, tansy and wormwood

How I use herbs - Brahmi

How I use herbs - Yarrow

How I use herbs - Arrowroot

How I use herbs - Lucerne (afalfa)

How I use herbs - Lavender

How I use herbs - Rosemary and Thyme

How I use herbs - Oregano or Marjoram

How I use herbs - Sweet Violet

How I use herbs - Gotu Kola

How I use herbs - Lemongrass

How I use herbs - Coriander (or cilantro)

How I use herbs - Dill




Comments

  1. You are so lucky to have perennial chillis! I've grown a few varieties on my patio in the past. Bolivian rainbow chilli was my favourite - purple, yellow orange and red fruits all at once. I currently have a small fruit variety that I rescued from a supermarket that I've kept going for over a year on my kitchen windowsill.

    I love spicy food, but have children who aren't so keen yet. All spiciness has to be added after cooking, so the fresh plant is useful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Loved to read the way you store your peppers. This pepper you have is called Bishop's crown, a very mild chilli pepper and it belong to the Capsicum baccatum species.

    Capsicum frutescens are a part of Capsicum annum species and they are all annual or very short-lived perennial. The biggest difference between your pepper and capsicum frutescens is that frutescens fruits(pods or peppers) always grow erect, while your peppers Capsicum baccatum hang down. Also if you try them fresh they all have a slight citrusy aroma, like a touch of lemon or orange. I hope this helps :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Liz, we have a few different types if chillies including the one you have shown. I want to make some chilli oil and had a look online last night and found a few different ways to make it. I don't like hot food but the menfolk do.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Those chilies look like the piquant peppers I grew last year, they are good for stuffing with soft cheese, I did pickle some and made some into chili dipping sauce

    ReplyDelete
  5. i love chillis, & have several species that grow under the fig tree (moretonbay) birds eye; is one i know of definitely the others there are long skinny ones & short fat ones which have a slightly squared look to them; there are also some tiny ball ones; most of them are quite hot. the birds drop them.
    i do use them very sparingly now as they are part of the nightshade family which i have become allergic to, can't eat tomatoes or potatoes now & want to be able to eat the others so i don't eat them often anymore.
    great post
    thanx for sharing

    ReplyDelete

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