Skip to main content

Making our own sausage mix

Our butcher is coming next week and he will do two beasts this time, so we are getting organised.  I've written a lot about butchering over the years and this will be our eighth and ninth animals killed on our own property.  On that last day, they will know no fear, maybe some curiosity (who is that strange man pointing that stick at me?) and it will be a quick end to a fairly peaceful and comfortable life.  Its not such an easy day for us, it can be quite emotional seeing the death of an animal that you've raised from a young age, not to mention physically draining putting all the meat away, but its all worth it to get the best quality meat possible.


eight acres: bush butcher guide to home cured meats and sausage making review and sausage recipe for homekill butcher


One of the things we are doing this year is make our own sausage mix.  If you want to know more about home butchering in general, here are all the posts I've written in the past:

Homekill meat - some tips for beginners

Home butcher vs meatworks

Homekill butchering

Homekill butcher day - tips and tricks

Homekill beef - two small beef cattle for added co...

Getting the best from homekill meat

Organic sausage mix for home butchering

Homekill beef - is it worth it?

Wet aging our beef (and BBQ show and tell)



We are gradually getting more adventurous with our own recipes.  Even though the butcher offers marinade for the BBQ steak, stuffing for the rolled roast, flavoured brine for the corned meat, and pre-made sausage mix, we usually refuse the marinade and brine, and provide our own stuffing and sausage mix (and lately sausage skins as well).  The last few years I have bought an organic sausage mix.  The main reason was to avoid MSG in the standard mixes.  If you look at the ingredients in the standard butcher sausage mixes, they are generally pretty cheap and nasty.  The organic one was nice, but I couldn't get hold of the company to order it again this year, so we decided to try making our own.

Several years ago we bought an awesome little book called "The Bush Butcher's Guide to Home Cured Meats and Sausage Making" by Michael Gale.  This book contains 64 sausage recipes, as well as instructions for smoking meat and making bacon.  We did try a couple of the recipes and made our own sausages using the sausage attachment for our auger juicer/mincer, but they were a bit of a disaster due entirely to our own fault - over stuffing the sausages, although they tasted great.  We never came back to it because we always had so many sausages from the butcher!  I never wanted to bother the butcher with weird sausage requests, but then I realised that we can make up premixes ourselves, so it won't be any different to the bought ones.


eight acres: bush butcher guide to home cured meats and sausage making review and sausage recipe for homekill butcher


But I didn't want to make up a huge amount of sausages and find that we didn't like them (that happened a few times already and we had to feed them to the dogs/give them away/throw them out, which was a massive waste and disappointment).  So I bought some mince (gasp!) and made up mini batch of "sausages" without skins so that we could test each recipe.  Then when we knew which ones that we liked, I bought bulk herbs from the supermarket and made up premixes for 10kg of sausages each.  It was a lot of fun to try different herbs that I don't usually buy and make some very tasty sausage rissoles - things like mace and caraway seeds and nutmeg!

I contacted Michael Gale and you can still buy his book through Gumtree and he said I was welcome to share a recipe with you, so here is one of our favourites so far.  You can use this for sausages or meatballs (I later make the chicken bratwurst as meatballs with chicken mince and they were yummy too - I put in an egg instead of breadcrumbs).


Beef Sausage #1 - to make 1kg
800g lean beef
200g beef fat
3/4 cup cold water
3/4 cup breadcrumbs - optional, but some kind of filler does help to disperse the ingredients through a large amount of mine, so I used tapioca flour
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1 tablespoon onion flakes (or powder)
1 1/2 tablespoon salt (optional, but does really help bring out the flavour)
1 1/2 teaspoon garlic granules (or powder)
1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper
extra cold water as necessary

Have you made your own sausages?  Any favourite recipes?  Any tips for homekill butchering?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Getting started with chickens - Tanya from Lovely Greens

Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Farmer Liz: You will remember Tanya from Lovely Greens from the first series, she lives on the Isle of Mann and added chickens to her garden about a year ago.  You can leave comments for this post on Tanya's blog.



How many chickens (and other fowl) do you keep, what breed and what do you use them for (meat, eggs, slug control etc)?
Tanya: Around the same time that we were initially thinking about having hens another friend beat us to the punch. She went to the local pet store and bought a flat-pack hen house and chicken run combo and found a local farmer who had dozens of semi-feral chickens running around his property. One night he pulled three down from the trees and my friend took them home in a pet carrier. She named them Miracel, Carmen, and Geraldine and though they’re probably related they were all…

What to do with eight acres

Behind the scenes of my blog I can see the search terms that led people to find my blog.  It can be quite interesting to look through them occasionally and see what people are looking for.  Most of them involve chicken tractors, but another question that comes up regularly is “what can you do with eight acres?” or “how much land is eight acres?”.  Today I will try to answer this question.

Of course it is a very broad question, there are lots and lots of things you can do with eight acres, but I’m going to assume that you want to live there, feed your family and maybe make a little extra money.  I make that assumption because that’s what I know about, if you want to do something else with your eight acres, you will need to look somewhere else.

If you haven’t chosen your land yet, here a few things to look for.  Focus on the things you can’t change and try to choose the best property you can find in your price range.  Look for clean water in dams, bores or wells, either on the property …

Growing mushrooms in my kitchen!

I’ve been wanting to try growing mushrooms for some time. I LOVE mushrooms and we buy them from the supermarket every week, so I was keen to find a way to produce them at home to reduce waste and potentially cost as well.





A few years ago I found out that you could grow mushrooms from the spent mushroom compost from mushroom farms. So we dropped in to a farm on the Sunshine Coast and picked up a couple of boxes for $2 each. I diligently kept them dark and sprayed them with water, but in our climate, I just couldn’t keep them damp enough (and I had to keep them outside because our shed was too hot). I never managed to produce any mushrooms from those boxes, but when I gave up and tipped the compost out onto the garden, mushrooms sprang up everywhere. I wasn’t confident that they were the right mushrooms though, so I didn’t harvest any of those. As the proverb says, All mushrooms are edible, but some only once! I am generally a bit nervous about unidentified fungi.

Since then, I had…