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Make your own natural soap

Would you like to try making your own soap from natural ingredients, but don’t know where to start? This eBook will take you through everything you need to know to make simple soaps from natural ingredients, including herbs, clays, charcoal, oatmeal and coffee grounds. Tallow is cheap and locally available, and it makes long-lasting moisturising soaps, it is an under-utilised ingredient in home soapmaking in my opinion, but this eBook will show you how to use it yourself, with 10 recipes specifically designed for tallow soap.

Available from Etsy and Amazon.





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1. Background
Why use soap?
But I thought soap was harsh?
Why use homemade soap?
Why use tallow for soapmaking?
Soapmaking terms


2. Ingredients
What is soap?
Fats and oils
Caustic and caustic solution
Water (and other liquids)
Colours
Fragrance
Other ingredients


3. Cold process soapmaking
Step 1: Gather all the ingredients and equipment for the recipe
Step 2: Prepare the fats and oils
Step 3: Prepare the caustic solution
Step 4: Match temperatures
Step 5: Mix the caustic into the fats and oils
Step 6: Add ingredients at trace
Step 7: Pour into moulds
Step 8: Cut the soap and allow to cure


4. Equipment


5. Soapmaking books and resources


6. Recipes
Basic Tallow Soap
Pink Clay Soap
Green Herb Soap
True Grit Soap
Black Magic Soap
Salt Spa Soap
Honey and Oatmeal Soap
Neem Oil Soap
Sustainable Shaving soap
Cleaning Soap
Formulate your own
7. References
8. Appendix 1: Rendering tallow or lard
9. Appendix 2: Making herb infused oil
Slow Method




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