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Homemade vanilla extract

I have been thinking of making vanilla extract for a while, but it wasn't until I started making ice-cream, which required a tablespoon of vanilla and I quickly emptied the little bottle that I had bought years earlier, that I saw the need to make it in bulk.
day one
Vanilla extract is very easy to make, and if you do use large amounts of vanilla, its probably worth doing.  All you need is dried vanilla pods and vodka or another spirit of your choice.  Just split the vanilla pods and put them in a jar with the spirit, give it a shake occasionally, and when it smells right, its ready to use, just decant the liquid into another jar, and add more vodka.  Or leave it even longer for a stronger extract.

after six weeks
I like making my own because I know exactly what is in it.  I bought organic fair-trade vanilla pods and used 8 pods in 200 mL of vodka.  I chose an expensive brand of vodka.  The vanilla extract that I usually buy contains sugar, so the one I made doesn't smell as sweet, but that allows me to control the sugar content of my food more easily as well.

Have you made vanilla extract?  Would you like to try?


From The Farm Blog HopEverything Home with Carol  Small Footprint Fridays - A sustainable living link-up  Unprocessed Fridays Link-up GMN

Comments

  1. I like the simplicity of it. Plus not everything needs to have its own sugar content. You can always add whatever amounts you feel comfortable with later on, without having to calculate all the sugar in everything.

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  2. great idea, so you basically make a vanilla tincture?

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  3. Hi Liz,
    I store my vanilla pods in a jar with sugar. The sugar gets incensed, used for baking, then topped up again.
    Vanilla, just about, always goes with a sweet dish
    http://marijke-sander.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/vanilla-lime.html
    Cheers,
    Marijke

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    Replies
    1. oh that sounds delicious! I have some spare pods...

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  4. I have two bottles on the go right now. One for me and i was thinking that the other would make a nice Christmas gift. I didnt split them but the vodka is still taking on colour. If it takes longer it doesnt matter as it is actually attractive to see.

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  5. My Vanilla pods and the bottle of booze are sitting on the bench waiting to be put together this afternoon. How cool that you wrote about this today.

    Barb.

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  6. We've been doing the same thing for a few years too. I blogged about it a few times like you because it's just SO easy. I even got some coworkers at my office to do the same. They are very happy with the results. And isn't it always the greatest feeling to know what's in something you eat, knowing that you made it and know it's entire history, ha.

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  7. Great idea after reading this I just made some, thanks for posting x

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  8. I've never considered this but what a great idea. Thanks for sharing on the Home Acre Hop.

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  9. I'll definitely be making this with our own grappa. Thanks!

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  10. Fantastic idea, but I don't use enough to make my own.

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  11. Thanks for reminding me I wanted to try this Liz. Off to make it now :-)

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  12. How simple is this recipe, I must try it.
    thank you Liz. x

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  13. I made vanilla one year for Christmas gifts. I read somewhere that you have to use at least 6 beans per cup of alcohol for it to be a real 'extract'. I've still got my batch and top it up occasionally...so yum!

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  14. I've never done this before but I'd like to try. Thanks for sharing with us at the HomeAcre Hop! We look forward to having you back again tomorrow: http://wp.me/p2urYY-13p

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  15. thanks for all your comments, it is so simple and easy, I'm not surprised that so many have tried it already and I hope the rest will go ahead and make some too :)

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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