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Growing food in 2014

Growing food in 2014 has been a challenge, but I think 2013 prepared me for the worst.  Our climate is both freezing in winter and dry and hot in summer, so planning for both extremes is not easy.  I am gradually learning what does grow well, when and how to get the most from our greywater.  I've written about climate and farming, as well as vege gardening.  And I've written about one herb every month, which has helped me to learn more about the herbs in my garden.  Here's what I wrote about growing food in 2014:



Growing vegetables
Setting up another worm farm
Growing and eating chokos (chayotes)

Seed saving and seed swap
Does growing vegetables save you money?





 Our frustrating climate
Surviving the QLD Heat Wave(s)
Can't buy me rain....
Frost - what is it and how to manage it

Thoughts on farming
Who is a farmer?
Deadstock



My Herb Garden
How I use herbs
How I use herbs - Mint, Peppermint and Spearmint
How I use herbs - Aloe Vera
How I use herbs - Basil
How I use herbs - Ginger, galangal and turmeric
How I use herbs - Marigold, calendula and winter taragon
How I use herbs - Soapwort
How I use herbs - Comfrey
How I use herbs - Nasturtium
How I use herbs - Parsley
How I use herbs - Borage



Permaculture and some wonderful guest posts
Permaculture on Eight Acres
Permaculture - Produce no Waste - with Linda from Greenhaven
How I use Permaculture - with Chris from Gully Grove
Permaculture - applying the basics with Homehill Farm
Planning a property using permaculture

Summaries from previous years....
What I wrote about my garden in 2013
How my garden grew - 2012 Update


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