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Blogoversary and time for a Christmas break

Well I can't believe I have just past 6 years writing on this blog!  I've been taking some time lately to go back into the archives and update old posts, and I really enjoy reading what I wrote back then, seeing how much I've learnt on some topics, and how much I've forgotten on others!  I'll keep reposting them as I work through them.




This year I've seen some good bloggy friends stop writing, which has been quite sad (I miss them even though I've never met them!).  Ohio Farmgirl who has blogged for years and has a wealth of information on self-sufficiency, particularly butchering pigs and just general common-sense stuff about growing your own food, has stopped blogging, but at least can still be found on facebook if you know where to look ;)

And Our New Life in the Country, which I enjoyed mostly for the sweet doggies, but also more common sense chats about gardening, chooks and downsizing, has announced her last post.

There are more that have not officially stopped, but haven't posted for so long, I miss them too.

Fortunately there are new friends, and old friends who have found new energy - Craving Fresh is back up and running with a new garden looking fabulous!




Pete asked me if I thought I would stop blogging.  Nope.  I have too much to say.  Maybe not as much time to say it at the moment, so the frequency has reduced a little, but still books to read and review, new herbs to write about, soap recipes to explain, knitting and crochet projects to show off and so many photos of the doggies, I've got to put them somewhere.  I also like having the record, because I forget what we did, why and how, so some of the older posts are as useful to me as they are to anyone else!

A lot of people are writing about homestead goals at this time of the year.  We don't really set goals as such.  We have a list of jobs that need doing and we work on whatever is the most urgent at the time, sometimes unexpected things (like fences) take priority and other nice-to-have jobs get put off.  I prefer not to stress about that kind of thing.  The house will get finished eventually and other long-term jobs will get done.  As long as all the animals go to sleep happy and healthy, we've had a good day on the farm.  We've let a few things go this year as we've been busy with the house and also planning to move soon.  We won't be hatching chicks this year and the garden has been a little neglected.

For Christmas we're going to the beach for a few days to stay with Pete's parents and then we have a few days off work to do some work around the farm :)  Depending how hot it is. This time of year is really not conducive to doing much after 10am, and very good for extended naps.  I'll be back in January sometime to finish of the Holistic Management series, update you the house progress and write about several new herbs in my garden.  And I've nearly finished my soapmaking book, its going to my proof-readers very soon.  I usually do round-up posts at this time of year, I'll do them in January instead so you can catch up on anything you missed in 2016.

In the meantime, you can find me on facebook and instagram (I love instagram, its so much fun!).

I hope you all have a wonderful Christmas and New Year, thanks so much for all your comments here and on other social media, I appreciate them all.  See you in 2017!

What are you planning for the holidays?  What do you want to see on Eight Acres in 2017?  Do you miss any blogs that have stopped this year?  Any new favourites?  

Comments

  1. Merry Christmas to you to Liz, have a wonderful break by the sea!

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  2. Have a lovely Christmas, Liz and a happy start to the new year that's fast approaching. Enjoy your little break by the sea. Meg:)

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  3. Merry Christmas to you and Peter. You will have a lovely time here on the coast, the weather forecast is for the high 20's, so a bit cooler than earlier in the week and only a chance of very light rain. So perfect beach weather, and perfect Christmas weather. It is very brown here though at the moment, but that glorious blue ocean will make up for the lack of green.

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  4. Happy Christmas, Liz. How nice to spend some time at the beach. I love the beach. I look forward to your blog posts in 2017.

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  5. Congratulations on 6 years, well done. hope you have a lovely Christmas and the heat isn't too bad.
    I would love to buy some beeswax candles if you start making them in your new shed setup, I think the honey wax scent would be lovely.
    Enjoy your break at the beach.

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  6. Congratulations Liz on this milestone. I've enjoyed reading your writings for quite awhile and have found some wonderfully useful information here. I'm so happy to know that you will continue, as I don't know what I'd do without your words some days, and your down to earth good sense. I hope you and Pete have a fabulous break away from the farm, and enjoy a fun Christmas with family. X

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  7. I can respect anyone's desire to give up blogging, if it's getting in the way of living their life, or they want more privacy. But I do so appreciate those who continue to potter along too. So congratulations for reaching 6 years!! I look forward to reading your thoughts in 2017.

    I've considered giving up blogging in the past, but I could never stick with it long. Blogging is like my virtual diary. I need to talk out my life on the land, to make better sense of it. I get held to account by putting it in writing, lol. Like you though, there are ebbs and flows, depending how busy I am.

    Merry Christmas, enjoy your holidays and we'll catch up next year.

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  8. I've said it before and I'll say it again....this is not just a blog - it is a veritable encyclopedia!

    A wonderful Christmastide to you - remember to stop and relish all your accomplishments.

    Phil

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  9. Hi Liz! Oh my, I just love your blog! I just stumbled across it, and am thrilled that I did! Subscribed & bookmarked! 😃 I really enjoy networking with other bloggers, especially other homesteaders. If you're interested, please visit my blog, and subscribe to stay in touch! Merry Merry Christmas to you and your family! 🐓🎄

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  10. I agree, there are some blogs that have ended that I really miss... But I'm happy you are still here. :-)

    For me there tends to be more to say than time to say it. But I love having the record, and am a bit annoyed with my self having not gotten a few specific posts out over the last year.

    Happy New Year!

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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