Skip to main content

Holistic management - part 7: Completing the feedback loop

The book Holistic Management: A New Framework for Decision Making (affiliate link) sets out a guide to developing a holistic goal for your farm or business.  See my introduction to Holistic Management here, and part 2: four key insights for the reasons why holistic management is important and part 3: holistic goal for understanding what you are managing and what you want from it.  I reviewed the ecosystem processes in part 4 - the water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics.

In part 5 the book takes that understanding of ecosystem processes and discusses the tools that we can use to manage ecosystem processes in brittle and non-brittle environments, including: money and labour, human creativity, technology, rest, fire, grazing, animal impact and living organisms.  In part 6 we learnt about questions to ask to test our management decisions against the holistic goal defined in part 3.  This ensures that every action takes us closer to achieving our goal.


Part 7 is short - only one chapter, but an important concept.  Anyone familiar with the the basic Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycle will recognise the need for "completing the feedback loop".  The basis of this chapter is monitoring the effect of your decision after implementation to make sure you got it right.  Even though you will have tested the decision as per part 6, you will have had to make assumptions, and if any of these were wrong, or you missed something, maybe it will turn out to be the wrong decision, despite best efforts.  Savory says to always consider that you could have been wrong.  The earlier you can realise this and change direction, the better.  Maybe you will have to vary plans slightly to make it work, or maybe you will have to cancel the whole project, but the earlier this happens the best chance you have of saving your money and effort for a more successful endeavour.

Part of the planning process should be considering how to monitor progress.  In some cases this might mean using a small test batch or area instead of investing fully.  For example, when we wanted to try perennial pasture, we only planned a few acres to start with.  We checked it weekly, at first it looked like the pasture was not growing and whole thing had been a disaster, but then it started to grow and is now doing well.  We learnt which grass varieties thrived, we didn't need fertiliser, and it takes a couple months for the pasture to look good.  We are waiting for a good time to plant the rest of the paddock now.  If it hadn't gone well, we would have had an opportunity to revise the plan before spending time and money on the entire area that needed to be planted.


It might also mean looking for "leading indicators" that your plan is working or not working.  If you decide to use natural methods for buffalo fly control, you might then say, if we inspect the cattle and they are just covered in flies, then we will agree that this particular method doesn't work and will go back to chemical methods (or another natural method) before the welfare of the cattle is affected, but if we see no flies then we will conclude that its a success.  You need to decide in advance how you will know if your plan is working or not working as early as possible.

Savory also suggests looking for evidence such as plant spacing, soil litter cover, soil density, aeration or organic content, quality of water run-off and insect activity to monitor long-term changes.

Do you have examples where you have monitored a plan and made changes?





Below are some Amazon affiliate links to books related to Holistic Management.  If you would like to read my reviews of these books, see the following links:

Joel Salatin's books

Peter Andrew's books on Natural Sequence Farming

Permaculture Principles



     
   





Comments

Popular posts from this blog

What to do with eight acres

Behind the scenes of my blog I can see the search terms that led people to find my blog.  It can be quite interesting to look through them occasionally and see what people are looking for.  Most of them involve chicken tractors, but another question that comes up regularly is “what can you do with eight acres?” or “how much land is eight acres?”.  Today I will try to answer this question.

Of course it is a very broad question, there are lots and lots of things you can do with eight acres, but I’m going to assume that you want to live there, feed your family and maybe make a little extra money.  I make that assumption because that’s what I know about, if you want to do something else with your eight acres, you will need to look somewhere else.

If you haven’t chosen your land yet, here a few things to look for.  Focus on the things you can’t change and try to choose the best property you can find in your price range.  Look for clean water in dams, bores or wells, either on the property …

Growing and eating chokos (chayotes)

** Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about my garden, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Cooking chokos (not be confused with another post about cooking chooks) has been the subject of a few questions on my blog lately, so here's some more information for you.
Chokos - also known as Chayote, christophene or christophine, cho-cho, mirliton or merleton, chuchu, Cidra, Guatila, Centinarja, Pipinola, pear squash, vegetable pear, chouchoute, güisquil, Labu Siam, Ishkus or Chowchow, Pataste, Tayota, Sayote - is a vine belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family, along with pumpkins, squash and melons, with the botanical name Sechium edule.


The choko contains a large seed, like a mango, but if you pick them small enough it is soft enough to eat.  If you leave the choko for long enough it will sprout from one end and start to grow a vine.  To grow the choko, just plant the sprouted choko a…

How to make coconut yoghurt

Lately I have been cutting back on eating dairy.  I know, I know, we own two house cows!  But I am trying to heal inflammation (bad skin) and dairy is one of the possible triggers, so as a last resort and after much resistance, I decided I had better try to cut back.  Its been hard because I eat a LOT of cheese, and cook with butter, and love to eat yoghurt (and have written extensively about making yoghurt).  I had to just give up cheese completely, switch to macadamia oil and the only yoghurt alternative was coconut yoghurt.  I tried it and I like it, but only a spoonful on some fruit here and there because it is expensive!





The brand I can get here is $3 for 200 mL containers.  I was making yoghurt from powdered milk for about 50c/L.  So I was thinking there must be a way to make coconut yoghurt, but I didn't feel like mucking around and wasting heaps of coconut milk trying to get it right....  and then Biome Eco Store sent me a Mad Millie Coconut Yoghurt Kit to try.  The kit is…