Skip to main content

Corn relish - lactofermented and "normal"

We bought 8 corn cobs for $2 at the farmers market and knew we couldn't eat all of it and I really really wanted to try making relish (was hoping to grow corn, but that didn't work out), so it was a perfect opportunity to try a fermented relish and a vinegar relish based on these recipes:
They both started the same way, cut the corn from the cob, chop some capsicum, cucumber, tomato and blend.



For the vinegar relish I then cooked about half the corn/vege mixture with salt, sugar, vinegar, tumeric, cumin, mustard and pepper.


The other half of the mixture was mixed cold with whey, salt and coriander (by the way, I freeze the whey, so it hasn't been sitting the fridge since January!)


These are the finished products, lactofermented relish on the left, vinegar relish on the right.


Comparison:
  • I like the taste of both relishes, the lactofermented relish is "fresher" tasting, especially with the coriander.
  • The lactofermented relish is quicker to make, has less ingredients, and doesn't have to be cooked.  It will also last longer as I don't have a pressure canner to preserve the vinegar pickle for longer (and that's a bit pointless for one jar anyway!).
  • Lactofermenting results can be variable (in my experience so far) and don't always get eaten before they go off, but then neither does the vinegar pickle.
Just in case you think I'm a fermenting genius, below are two fermenting fails.  There are still some pickles that are ok, but this jar went mouldy and we never finished the sauerkraut, I think we just don't like it that much.  It has been fun to experiment though and to try new foods and preserving methods.


Do you ferment anything?

Comments

  1. Hi just wanted say I love your posts. Keep them up.
    I read them everyday.
    I think I will try your corn ideas over the weekend.
    Sam

    ReplyDelete
  2. I can smell those spice combinations in my mind! So good with the vinegar.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love fermenting our veggies but have had mix results using mason jars. I found a post the other day on how to make your own airlock lids for mason jars. She made 4 lids for a little over $8.

    ReplyDelete
  4. thanks everyone :) love the airlock idea (I think I saw the same or similar post recently too), just haven't got around to it yet...

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have brought myself a cop of nourishing traditions but boy what a big book to get through. I have been enjoying your reviews and experiments

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

Popular posts from this blog

The new Eight Acres website is live!

Very soon this blogspot address will automatically redirect to the new Eight Acres site, but in the meantime, you can check it out here.  You will find all my soaps, ebooks and beeswax/honey products there, as well as the blog (needs a tidy up, but its all there!).  I will be gradually updating all my social media links and updating and sharing blog posts over the next few months.  I'm very excited to share this new website with you!


Chicken tractor guest post

Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about chickens, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Tanya from Lovely Greens invited me to write a guest post on chicken tractors for her blog.  I can't believe how many page views I get for chicken tractors, they seem to be a real area of interest and I hope that the information on my blog has helped people.  I find that when I use something everyday, I forget the details that other people may not be aware of, so in this post for Tanya, I tried to just write everything I could think of that I haven't covered in previous posts.  I tried to explain everything we do and why, so that people in other locations and situations can figure out how best to use chicken tractors with their own chickens.


If you want to read more about chicken tractors, head over the Tanya's blog and read my post, then come back here to leave a comment.  Tanya lives…

Worm farm maintenance

I have had the worm farm for over a year now, and I have to say it’s the easiest and most convenient way I have found to make compost and to dispose of vege scraps and other organic waste. I have not had much success with putting everything in a compost bin, I find that the food scraps go all sloppy and don’t really compost properly. I have found that my current system works much better, all food scraps go to the worms and the compost bin is for weeds and manure. The worms are able to eat all our food scraps and convert it to compost and worm tea, and there is still plenty for the compost bin, but now its not full of sloppy food scraps. People often ask if its necessary or possible to have both a worm farm and a compost bin, and I think it actually works better for us.



The worm farm really requires very little maintenance.  All I have to do is tip in more food scraps every few days, drain the tea once a week or so, check that the top tray is damp (if not, tip in half a bucket of …