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Farm update: August 2012

We had even more rain in July, about 50mL, this is very unusual, so now I'm wondering if we will see a wet summer, or a dry summer!  Either way, we have some nice soil moisture and the pasture is starting to green.  This year my bean plant hasn't died back, which is a shame because I planted peas around it, and now they have to grow through the bean instead, things don't always go to plan in the garden....

Meanwhile, the broadbeans are flowering, so I might have some beans soon.  And the strawberries are flowering too.  The pak choi is recovering from the chicken attack.  The bok choi are all going to seed, even the little ones, so I'm guessing that they are done for the year.  Mizuna and kale are still doing well.  The cabbages are forming heads.  I've picked some broccoli, but its small as usual (any tips?).  Have been harvesting carrots, swedes and turnips.  Still no beetroot, but its getting bigger.  Planted more beetroot and radishes.  Self seeded lettuce and parsley are doing well!  Its nearly time to think about spring planting, I have the seed catalogues out already!


broadbeans and broccoli

poor pak choi
We finally butchered the two roosters that we hatched in spring last year, they are in the freezer.  Then we were able to rearrange the rest of the chickens and they are all more comfortable in larger cages.  We have had two eggs a day for the past couple of days, so maybe its the beginning of a promising egg season....  I'll post more about the chicken butchering, and we're having Bratwurst butchered in the first week of August too, which will help reduce the amount of supplement feeding.  The grass is getting greener too.

a frog that jumped out of the clothes pegs

Chime looking thoughtful

Cheryl - Farmer Pete went that way,
and now she's wondering if she should have gone with him

Comments

  1. Your garden is looking much more productive than mine although I have been picking lettuce for sometime. My beetroot are growing but no nice fat bulbs as yet and the peas you sent me are about 1 1/2 inches high...yipee. Can't help with the broccoli apart from suggest that maybe you need richer soil. I dug heaps of compost into my bed and they grew really well. The cauliflower (in the same bed) wren't a success though. ; - (

    ReplyDelete
  2. thanks calidore, actually I'm very pleased with my garden this winter compared to my poor effort last winter. It seems that just a few hours put into seed planting and transplanting in Autumn is worth it to get a steady supply of greens all winter. Yes maybe my broccoli need more compost, will keep trying!

    ReplyDelete

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