Skip to main content

One pot chocolate cake

Even though we don't eat much sugar, chocolate cake is still an occasional treat.  The thing I hate about baking is cleaning up, so this "one pot" cake is my favourite recipe!  If I could take the handle off the pot and put the entire thing in the oven I would....

Rather than "creaming" the butter and sugar, in this recipe you dissolve the sugar, cocoa powder and butter in milk by heating it in a pot.  I then stir in the 2 eggs and the flour and scoop the batter into a cake tin.  The only thing to remember is to let the mixture cool enough before adding the eggs, so that they don't cook :)


Heat in a pot until combined (keep heat as low as possible, otherwise you have to wait for ages for it to all cool down, the butter will melt just above body temperature, so it doesn't need much heat):

1 cup milk
1 1/4 cups sugar (I use whatever I have, this time brown sugar, when that's used up I'm on to the rapadura)
125g butter
1/2 cup cocoa powder (using up the normal stuff, then have a stash of organic powder)
1 tsp bicarb soda

When the mixture is cool enough, beat in:

2 eggs

And then:

1 1/2 cup wheat flour (I used 1 of white and 1/2 of wholemeal)
1 1/2 tsp baking powder

Transfer to a cake tin and cook for 40 min in your woodstove or in a normal oven at 180 degC


What do you think?  Do you have a one pot cake recipe?

Comments

  1. Well it looks simple enough, I will see if the wife will give it a try. I do the cooking of meals and she bakes stuff like cakes. She made a crock pot chocolate cake once that was a disaster, I wanted to shove it down a ground hog hole.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have a recipe very similar to this one, which I am in fact using today for a birthday celebration tomorrow. It is my go to recipe when I need to bake a cake.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Simple, quick and easy - I like it. Thinking I will try this tonight!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I make one very similar and it always turns out moist. I love it as there aren't many bowls that need washing up afterwards. Glad you added the wood stove directions as well!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

Popular posts from this blog

Chicken tractor guest post

Sign up for my weekly email updates here , you will find out more about chickens, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon.... Tanya from Lovely Greens invited me to write a guest post on chicken tractors for her blog.  I can't believe how many page views I get for chicken tractors, they seem to be a real area of interest and I hope that the information on my blog has helped people.  I find that when I use something everyday, I forget the details that other people may not be aware of, so in this post for Tanya, I tried to just write everything I could think of that I haven't covered in previous posts.  I tried to explain everything we do and why, so that people in other locations and situations can figure out how best to use chicken tractors with their own chickens. The dogs like to hang out behind the chicken tractors and eat chicken poo.  Dogs are gross! If you want to read more about chicken tractor

Getting started with beekeeping: how to harvest honey

While honey is not the only product from a beehive, its the one that most beekeepers are interested in and it usually takes a year or so to let the bees build up numbers and store enough honey before there is enough to harvest.  There are a few different ways to extract honey from frames.  We have a manual turn 2-frame certifugal extractor.  A lot of people with only a few hives will just crush and strain the comb.  This post is about how we've been extracting honey so far (four times now), and there are links at the end to other bloggers who use different methods so you can compare. Choose your frames Effectively the honey is emergency food stores for the bees, so you have to be very careful not to take too much from the hive.  You need to be aware of what is flowering and going to flower next and the climate.  Particularly in areas with cold winters, where the bees cannot forage for some time.  We are lucky to have something flowering most of the year and can take honey

Homekill beef - is it worth it?

We got another steer killed a few weeks ago now, and I weighed all the cuts of meat so that I could work out the approximate value of the meat and compare the cost of raising a steer to the cost of buying all the meat from the butcher.   My article has been published on the Farm Style website , which is a FREE online community for small and hobby farmers to learn everything about farming and country living . If you want to know more, head over the Farm Style to  read the the article  and then come back here for comments and questions.  Do you raise steers?  Is it worth it?  Do you have any questions? More about our home butchering here .