Skip to main content

Ginger and lemon tea

I tried some lovely tea at a cafe recently, it was ginger and rosella.  I bought some of the tea to take home, it was expensive, and when I finished the packet I wondered if I could make my own....

I didn't have any rosella, but I thought I could start with trying to dry the ginger.  I bought some organic ginger from the the Nanango markets and sliced it up really thin.  I spread it out in my dehydrator to dry.  I ran the dehydrator on and off for a couple of days (its very loud, so I don't like to have it on when I'm in the kitchen), until the ginger was crispy dry.

At the same time I had a massive bag of lemons from a friend's tree.  I knew that they were organic, so I decided to peel the skins and dry them as well, to add some lemon flavour to me tea.  The ginger/lemon smell in the house was wonderful!

A jar of dried ginger and lemon peel

I have some rosella seeds now after swapping seeds earlier in the month, so I've planted them and maybe I'll soon have enough rosella fruit to make ginger and rosella tea.  I'm also trying to grow enough ginger to keep up with all the ginger ale I make and now ginger tea....  In the meantime I have plenty of other herbs in my tea cupboard.... lemon grass, lemon myrtle, pepper mint, mint, calendula petals, and a little tarragon, oregano and thyme.  I like to mix these up in a little jar to take to work where I enjoy my morning herbal tea.


Comments

  1. That is exactly how I like my rosella tea - with ginger - except I just grate a bit of fresh ginger (I keep it in the freezer) into the pot. My kefir is doing great - I am getting consistent, thick, nice tasting kefir every day.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey, Nice to discover your blog! My husband and I are about to move to the Lockyer Valley to 11 acres to start living a bit more of the good life (hopefully, we find out if our contract goes unconditional today). Nice to find other people nearby with similar priorities.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good to hear AA, the Rosella seeds you sent me have sprouted, now I just have to wait for them to get big!

    Nice to meet you Edwina!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am going to try this - it would make an awesome Christmas present in a pretty jar too.
    Sorry I haven't been commenting lately , I have been reading some great posts, but blogger wouldn't let me comment- it seems things are back to normal now.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your ginger and lemon tea sounds delicious.

    My fav home grown teas are lemon balm, lemongrass and a mix of lime & thyme. I usually make them fresh - but I might get in the habit of drying some.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

Popular posts from this blog

Worm farm maintenance

I have had the worm farm for over a year now, and I have to say it’s the easiest and most convenient way I have found to make compost and to dispose of vege scraps and other organic waste. I have not had much success with putting everything in a compost bin, I find that the food scraps go all sloppy and don’t really compost properly. I have found that my current system works much better, all food scraps go to the worms and the compost bin is for weeds and manure. The worms are able to eat all our food scraps and convert it to compost and worm tea, and there is still plenty for the compost bin, but now its not full of sloppy food scraps. People often ask if its necessary or possible to have both a worm farm and a compost bin, and I think it actually works better for us.



The worm farm really requires very little maintenance.  All I have to do is tip in more food scraps every few days, drain the tea once a week or so, check that the top tray is damp (if not, tip in half a bucket of …

The new Eight Acres website is live!

Very soon this blogspot address will automatically redirect to the new Eight Acres site, but in the meantime, you can check it out here.  You will find all my soaps, ebooks and beeswax/honey products there, as well as the blog (needs a tidy up, but its all there!).  I will be gradually updating all my social media links and updating and sharing blog posts over the next few months.  I'm very excited to share this new website with you!


Chicken tractor guest post

Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about chickens, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Tanya from Lovely Greens invited me to write a guest post on chicken tractors for her blog.  I can't believe how many page views I get for chicken tractors, they seem to be a real area of interest and I hope that the information on my blog has helped people.  I find that when I use something everyday, I forget the details that other people may not be aware of, so in this post for Tanya, I tried to just write everything I could think of that I haven't covered in previous posts.  I tried to explain everything we do and why, so that people in other locations and situations can figure out how best to use chicken tractors with their own chickens.


If you want to read more about chicken tractors, head over the Tanya's blog and read my post, then come back here to leave a comment.  Tanya lives…