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Fermented mustard

I have been wanting to try making mustard, but my plans involved growing my own mustard seed.... and that just hasn't happened yet, so I realised I was just going to have to try it with some bought mustard seeds, not organic or anything, oh well.

The recipe is pretty simple, just combine 1/2 cup of mustard seeds, 1/3 cup of water, 2 T organic unpasteurised apple cider vinegar, 1 T raw local honey, 2 T whey from raw milk cream cheese (or kefir or yoghurt), 1 t sea salt, a little garlic and lemon juice, in the blender and whiz until it reaches the desired consistency.

The only difference between this fermented mustard and other mustard, is the addition of the whey.  You need to leave the jar of mustard at room temperature for a few days to allow it to ferment slightly.  You can't taste the fermentation, but it will help the mustard to last longer.

Fermented mustard is the accompaniment to homegrown beef steak!  Especially if you are trying to avoid the high-sugar sauce options.

Have you grown mustard seeds?  Made mustard?  Fermented anything lately?

From The Farm Blog Hop  Homestead Barn Hop

Comments

  1. Just what I was looking for! Lots of fermented recipes. I have ginger carrots fermenting and I might try this next :-)

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    Replies
    1. Glad to share the fermenting fun... hope you found a few recipes to try :)

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  2. That is interesting, I have mustard growing but the 30 below freezing temperatures has laid it low but maybe it will come back for seed in the spring. If not I can plant a patch of it for summer seeds.

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  3. Hi Liz,
    I have never fermented anything. But have always wanted to try my hand at mustard..but had wondered where to purchase bulk mustard seed. I always buy smaller amounts for my Bread and butter cucumbers.
    Will have to try . Thanks for showing us.
    Jane.

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    Replies
    1. I just bought it from the supermarket, you don't need heaps to make jar of mustard though, I hope I can grow it eventually...

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  4. I'm not evern sure I'd let the stuff in the house! yuk! Never been a fan of mustard (I suppose it's ok in a sauce)

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    Replies
    1. Although I've grown mustard as a salad crop and a green manure before now that worked well. I guess if its fermented it would keep well

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  5. yeah Pete won't eat it either, but if you generally like mustard, its not too bad!

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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