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How I use herbs - Chervil

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) was completely new to me until I bought some seeds on a whim.  I had never tasted it and had no idea what it looked like or what to do with it!  Like dill and parsley, chervil is now one of the herbs that self-seeds in my garden and appears each autumn as the weather cools.

eight acres: how to grow and use chervil


How to grow chervil
Chervil grows easily from seeds.  I just scattered them around the garden at first, and now it self-seeds.  No special treatment required.  It grows best in the cooler months, in shade, with plenty of moisture.  It dies off in summer in my garden, after producing flowers and seeds.  It doesn't grow very big, so its best to seed generously and weed out unwanted plants later.

How to use chervil
Chervil is very similar to parsley, but has a more subtle flavour, with a faint hint of aniseed.  I enjoy it chopped up with parsley, nasturtium leaves, coriander leaves, basil and anything else fresh and green (purslane, herb robert etc) as a garnish in salads or added to soups and casseroles after cooking.  After I started growing chervil I recognised it in a salad at a fancy lunch event that I went to for work, so I am feeling very fashionable!

Medicinally, chervil is said to be good for digestion, as a blood cleanser, to lower blood pressure, and as a diuretic.  The juice can be used for skin conditions and a tea made from the leaves is used for eye conditions.

In the garden, if you let chervil flower it produces large umbels, which are attractive to beneficial insects.  Apparently the leaves can also be used to repel ants - I haven't tried that one though.

Do you grow chervil?  Do you use it in cooking or medicinally?



Other posts about herbs in my garden:

How I use herbs - Mint, Peppermint and Spearmint

How I use herbs - Aloe Vera

How I use herbs - Basil

How I use herbs - Ginger, galangal and turmeric

How I use herbs - Marigold, calendula and winter taragon

How I use herbs - Soapwort

How I use herbs - Comfrey

How I use herbs - Nasturtium

How I use herbs - Parsley

How I use herbs - Borage

How I use herbs - Herb Robert

How I use herbs - Purslane

How I use herbs - Chickweed

How I use herbs - Neem oil

How I use herbs - Rue, tansy and wormwood

How I use herbs - Brahmi

How I use herbs - Yarrow

How I use herbs - Arrowroot

Comments

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  2. It’s the first year I have it in my kitchen garden, I tried it because I love everything with aniseed.
    I’m made the best tartare sauce, using chervil. I do use it instead of parsley as well, through salads, mashed potatoes or on top of scrambled eggs. Would be nice with fennel I would say, to boost the flavour, plenty of that in the garden at the moment!

    ReplyDelete

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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