Skip to main content

How I use herbs - Gotu Kola

Here's another herb that is growing in my garden, quite wild now, but I don't know really how to use it.  Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica).  Its also known as Spadeleaf and Indian Pennywort.  Here's how I grow it and here's what my herb books say I should do with it!

eight acres: how to grow and use gotu kola


How to grow Gotu Kola
This herb seems to like damp soil and shade.  It sends out shoots,so it spreads easily, but is not deep rooted and invasive.  This makes it easy to propagate by transplanting some shoots. I haven't seen it flower yet, apparently they are small so maybe I missed them.  Its been in my garden for a few years, since I took a clump from Pete's parent's garden.  It does die back in winter when we get a frost, but then reappears in spring.  I keep it in a pot with the mint and other herbs, as that's the easiest way for me to keep the soil damp enough.



eight acres: how to grow and use gotu kola


How to use Goto Kola
You know this is a special herb when you see that Isabel Shippard devoted nearly six pages to it in her book "How can I use herbs in daily life?".  Gotu Kola is known as a longevity herb, but more specifically it is used for:

  • Skin healing as it stimulates collagen production (good for wounds and ulcers)
  • Strengthening veins - used for varicose veins and poor circulation
  • Nerve tonic - calming, reduces anxiety, improves memory
  • Anti-inflammatory - used for rheumatism (as an infusion/tea)

With two cautions:
  • Can cause sensitivity to sun exposure
  • May reduce fertility
Gotu Kola can be eaten fresh in salads, made into an infusion or tincture from either fresh or dried leafs.  Dried leafs can be made into a paste for topical application.  Fresh or dried leaves could be used to make an oil infusion and salve.

Do you grow Gotu Kola?  How do you use it?


How I use herbs - Mint, Peppermint and Spearmint

How I use herbs - Aloe Vera

How I use herbs - Basil

How I use herbs - Ginger, galangal and turmeric

How I use herbs - Marigold, calendula and winter taragon

How I use herbs - Soapwort

How I use herbs - Comfrey

How I use herbs - Nasturtium

How I use herbs - Parsley

How I use herbs - Borage

How I use herbs - Herb Robert

How I use herbs - Purslane

How I use herbs - Chickweed

How I use herbs - Neem oil

How I use herbs - Rue, tansy and wormwood

How I use herbs - Brahmi

How I use herbs - Yarrow

How I use herbs - Arrowroot

How I use herbs - Lucerne (afalfa)

How I use herbs - Lavender

How I use herbs - Rosemary and Thyme

How I use herbs - Oregano or Marjoram

How I use herbs - Sweet Violet

Comments

  1. Liz I have it growing in a pot as I wasn't sure how much it would spread. I bought it from Isabel a few years ago in case I get bad arthritis pain in the future. Now and again I break off a few leaves and chew them. Last year it had already started to die back but this year it is still going strong as it is so warm.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have a plant in my garden (a weed actually!) called pennywort. Some people say it is gota kola and others say that the two plants are different. It certainly grows well here in the tropics and most people say a couple of leaves a day are good for arthitis. I am pretty sure it is one and the same.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've been growing gotu kola for a few quite a few years for my dad. He eats two leaves a day for arthritis, and swears it helps. When he doesn't have it he notices. I used to grow it in a pot in Brisbane, but since we moved to a frost area I grow it under my lemon tree, which I cover on frost-predicted winter nights. It doesn't do as well in winter, but it does well enough to survive. We experimented with putting a few clumps (it's easy to dig up a section as it roots along it's runners), and definitely found that shady and wet areas work best. We also harvest and wash a bunch in autumn and freeze it so he can have it when the plant is struggling.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

Popular posts from this blog

Chicken tractor guest post

Sign up for my weekly email updates here , you will find out more about chickens, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon.... Tanya from Lovely Greens invited me to write a guest post on chicken tractors for her blog.  I can't believe how many page views I get for chicken tractors, they seem to be a real area of interest and I hope that the information on my blog has helped people.  I find that when I use something everyday, I forget the details that other people may not be aware of, so in this post for Tanya, I tried to just write everything I could think of that I haven't covered in previous posts.  I tried to explain everything we do and why, so that people in other locations and situations can figure out how best to use chicken tractors with their own chickens. The dogs like to hang out behind the chicken tractors and eat chicken poo.  Dogs are gross! If you want to read more about chicken tractor

Getting started with beekeeping: how to harvest honey

While honey is not the only product from a beehive, its the one that most beekeepers are interested in and it usually takes a year or so to let the bees build up numbers and store enough honey before there is enough to harvest.  There are a few different ways to extract honey from frames.  We have a manual turn 2-frame certifugal extractor.  A lot of people with only a few hives will just crush and strain the comb.  This post is about how we've been extracting honey so far (four times now), and there are links at the end to other bloggers who use different methods so you can compare. Choose your frames Effectively the honey is emergency food stores for the bees, so you have to be very careful not to take too much from the hive.  You need to be aware of what is flowering and going to flower next and the climate.  Particularly in areas with cold winters, where the bees cannot forage for some time.  We are lucky to have something flowering most of the year and can take honey

Homekill beef - is it worth it?

We got another steer killed a few weeks ago now, and I weighed all the cuts of meat so that I could work out the approximate value of the meat and compare the cost of raising a steer to the cost of buying all the meat from the butcher.   My article has been published on the Farm Style website , which is a FREE online community for small and hobby farmers to learn everything about farming and country living . If you want to know more, head over the Farm Style to  read the the article  and then come back here for comments and questions.  Do you raise steers?  Is it worth it?  Do you have any questions? More about our home butchering here .