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Enjoying winter slaw

Over winter we often find ourselves with a surplus of cabbage.  One thing that I like to make is coleslaw (or just slaw for short).  The coleslaw I remember as a child was just shredded cabbage, grated carrot and grated cheese (sometimes also raisins, apple and/or walnuts), saturated in mayonnaise.  Lately I have been experimenting with other ingredients.....

It has to contain shredded cabbage to be a proper coleslaw, but I also like to included grated root vegetables such as beetroot, carrot, turnip, swede and radish.  I will also include other green leafy veges, like any asian greens, mustard greens and nasturtium leaves.  Mint and parsley finely chopped are also delicious.  I prefer to use an olive oil and vinegar dressing, with a few herbs or mustard seeds, it just tastes fresher and not as heavy as mayonnaise.

What do you put in coleslaw?  What's your favourite salad combination?


The Self Sufficient HomeAcre
From The Farm Blog Hop     

Comments

  1. That sounds good, we like it better without so much mayonnaise. I haven't thought of using beet or rutabaga but it should go well with the cabbage and carrot.

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  2. Mm I love to make coleslaw with a a cider vinegar and sesame oil dressing, and touch of honey. Then I add sunflower and toasted sesame seeds to the cabbage. Super yummy.

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  3. A family favourite is shredded cabbage, walnuts, raisins and a mixture of 4/5 greek yoghurt and 1/5 mayonnaise as a dressing.
    When in season, add some pieces of peeled orange for extra colour.

    My cabbages seedlings got ploughed by the chooks, no cabbage this year.
    I'm hoping to pick up some nice cabbage at the markets to make a batch of sauerkraut.

    I loved your post on farming, we sure hope to get some more livestock on our property,
    but three very young kids, a veggie garden and a witches kitchen (my husbands words for my kefir, sourdough, stockpots and sprouts filled kitchen benches...) is enough craziness for now... But I keep learning and storing it away, thanks for sharing.
    Cheers, Marijke

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have never made "homemade" slaw!
    Looks great :)
    Thanks for sharing with the HomeAcre Hop!
    Sandra

    ReplyDelete

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