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Farm update - December 2013

November is the last month of spring and you can tell that Summer is approaching.  Its getting hot and humid and we've had regular storms, including hail.  In the space of four weeks the grass has gone from crunchy brown to bright green.  The cows seem very happy.  And our dam at Eight Acres is full again.

Donald is looking good
Its been my first full month of weekdays in Brisbane.  So far I think we are going ok, Pete seems to have kept the garden going and all the animals happy, and we've both had lots of real food to eat.

Cheryl and Chime helping with the chickens
Actually, I don't think there's much to tell you.  The chickens are laying (and I've found a very lucrative market for the eggs in Brisbane), we are milking Bella once a week, Nancy is growing, Molly's udder is shrinking, Monty is weaned and in the neighbour's paddock with Benny and Romeo, the cows at Cheslyn Rise have had 11 calves between the 25 of them, we still have six guinea fowl, and I think the dogs are enjoying more time with their mate Pete.  And most exciting of all, my article for Grass Roots was published in the Dec/Jan edition.

The chickens helping to clean up some garden trimmings
I wrote about the garden here (Pete's done a great job looking after it).

The guinea fowl checking out the same pile, they didn't eat any....
And here's an interesting blog about permaculture and cycling
Pete planting millet, fingers crossed we got the timing right

And finally, a free doco about the relationship between food and health.

How was your November?  What are you planning for December?

Comments

  1. Goodness, Donald is looking extremely good. He looks like that bull in Wall Street NY.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. haha, yes and he always seems to be a healthiest animal on the property.

      Delete
  2. Looking forward to seeing your grass roots article. How exciting!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Isn't the fresh green from rain a delight for everyone. I have to say Donald looks fantastic!

    I wanted to invite you to come visit my blog and see what I'm excited about! Plus perhaps entice you to enter my book giveaway. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Isn't it amazing how the season has changed! I am going to lock the horse up in the yard and hand feed because all this sweet green grass is making her too fat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. haha, it changes so quickly doesn't it, we can have dry one week, green the next and then dry again if it gets hot.

      Delete

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Thanks, I appreciate all your comments, suggestions and questions, but I don't always get time to reply right away. If you need me to reply personally to a question, please leave your email address in the comment or in your profile, or email me directly on eight.acres.liz at gmail.com

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